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I swore at my computer the other day (sorry Mom). You see, I had just seen a tweet that led me to this page:

That, of course, is the current Airbnb homepage, where they announced that they have built out neighborhood pages, such as my neighborhood of Boerum Hill.

I didn’t swear because they launched something that I wanted one of my clients to launch. I swore because they did it so damn well. These pages are beautiful. They have local knowledge, large photos (which is rare for travel, but makes so much sense), and they don’t talk about themselves – rather, they let people see the area and qualify themselves, with only a call to action at the end.

This marks, in my mind, the final step in a move towards the visual web – these pages are going to rank because they are so useful and beautiful (though they do need to work on SEO on these pages) and they will naturally attract links.

The web is becoming visual; SEOs need to get on board. Continue Reading…

Prioritizing “Yes”

John Doherty —  November 12, 2012

Alternatively – “When Saying Yes Hurts”

I see a lot of bloggers writing about the importance of saying “no”, and then I often see responses to these such as “Good for you!” and “Alright, way to get your priorities in order!” The interesting thing to me is that when someone says that they are learning to say no, it means they are already really good at saying “Yes.”

You don’t have to learn how to do something if you already know how to do it.

I can’t help but think, though, if sometimes we have to say “Yes!”. I want to talk about the types of people and priority in which saying “yes” is. Hopefully this speaks to the values through which I live my life. I started thinking about this post because I’m currently at TechStars’ Foundercon in Boston, just 5 days after I got back to NYC from Boston, because a respected industry peer asked me to speak in their stead. I wanted to and I needed to. Continue Reading…

You may or may not know that I am an adrenaline sports junkie. As a rock climber, skier, bike rider, and a recent first time skydiver (with plans to get my certification), I love watching content involving these sports. In fact, one of my Saturday rituals is to read an article or two on 99U, formerly The99Percent, and then to see what is live on RedBull TV.

That is, until I discovered the magic of GoPro’s content and now that is a go-to.

GoPro recently launched their Hero3 camera, which is considerably lighter, faster, and better (also more expensive) than my Hero2 which I bought a few months ago to chronicle my bicycle journeys around Brooklyn and NYC.

I had always wondered why GoPro didn’t do more marketing, and was genuinely curious what they would do when they launched a new product. After all, I’m pretty interested in viral marketing product launches, so let’s examine what GoPro did and how they successfully launched their new product.
Continue Reading…

Alright, time for the next installment of “X Is Not A Content Strategy”. I’ve decided to write a few posts around this because of the reception my post from last week, A Blog Is Not A Content Strategy, received from the community.

This week, we’re going to talk about linkbait. Linkbait is a term that was coined, apparently, by Aaron Wall of SEObook back in 2005 when he said if “”you are in a field that can’t build links naturally create linkbait” (source). To be clear, in this post I am talking about one-off linkbait pieces and not linkbait as part of a content strategy.

Continue Reading…

Content marketing has been around for years, but until recently Google was not making good on their word to rank content that deserves to rank. Instead, we could all easily find examples where sites were ranking off of low quality directories, link wheels, blog networks, and many other tactics. But since Penguin, Panda, and the myriad of other algorithm changes this year, SEOs have started to finally embrace content as a viable means, but we’re still running into old mindsets from clients, and honestly a lot of SEOs are not good at creating linkworthy content. Continue Reading…

America seems to be enamored with the idea of “overnight success”. We see people who become seemingly overnight sensations, often through discovery on Youtube, and are catapulted into the limelight. We see people on TV who become hyper-successful because they were on a reality show or something of the like. These people seem like “overnight successes”. I don’t think there’s any such thing, though.

Examples

Let’s look at a few of my favorite examples. Continue Reading…

One of the hardest parts of consulting, in my opinion, is figuring out which metrics matter to a business, and then reporting on those metrics to the client. Oftentimes, in my experience, businesses are not even sure which metrics to report on, so they report on as many as possible so as to not miss out on any important metrics.

Over time, I’ve better learned (though I’m admittedly still not incredible at it) to help my clients realize which metrics are important to their businesses, and more importantly often their bosses. Continue Reading…

Yesterday I gave away a best SEO blogs custom search engine. Today, I want to do the same for Local SEO blogs.

These are the best Local SEO blogs according to Dave Minchala, and here is a custom search engine for you.

Best Local SEO Blogs Custom Search Engine


Enjoy!

I was just chatting with my good buddy Dave Minchala about a recent change I saw in Google Maps (tl;DR HotelFinder is now integrated into it for me). A big long tweet chain started that brought in the heavy hitters of Local Search. Dave said:

 

That got me thinking – why not build it and share it? And while I’m at it, why not do it for the blogs that I know and trust and always go to for more information?

So here are two custom search engines for you to do just that. Continue Reading…

Recently I read an article called Content Marketing – Johnson & Johnson style. This article does an amazing job of dissecting some companies that are engaging in non-branded content marketing that supports their core business (mostly through internal advertising), namely Johnson & Johnson, American Express, AOL, the USPS, and GE.

This article flies in the face of people who say “My industry/niche is boring; how can I create linkworthy content?” To this I often think:

Boring content is only created by boring people. No industry is boring – only people are boring.

To combat this, I use a practice that I like to call B2C Linkbuilding for B2B Verticals. Continue Reading…